LCER Labour Supporters

Labour Electoral Reformers

Some of our MPs, MEPs & Union activists give their reasons for supporting reform of our voting system:

                       Paul Blomfield

                       Paul Blomfield

Paul Blomfield (Sheffield Central MP): “I want to explore the opportunities for progressive pluralism and a new approach to politics. I believe that the case for electoral reform has never been stronger and want to help ensure that LCER can push the issue to the centre of Labour’s agenda.”

                         Billy Hayes

                         Billy Hayes

Billy Hayes (former CWU General Secretary): “I voted to stay in the EU but it was strangely democracy enhancing. Every person knew their vote counted. Suddenly one person one vote actually meant just that. I would like to see Labour going into the 2020 election committed to PR in its Manifesto. Together with number of other democratic reforms, Elected House of Lords, automatic voter registration.”

                     Mary Honeyball

                     Mary Honeyball

Mary Honeyball (London MEP): “Whatever the result of the EU Referendum we have lots to learn from our European colleagues and parties. Most of them use much more pluralist voting systems. Our political culture remains firmly winner takes all. Hence the eagerness to forget about the 48 per cent of voters who chose REMAIN. We need to move beyond binary choices and explore possibilities which involve as many people as possible. In electoral reform terms we have witnessed a reluctance to make a binary choice between Labour and Conservative governments preferring PR choices among more parties. It is often Labour's vote which is split. We need to be willing to support PR going into the next general election for pragmatic and principled reasons.”

                     Stephen Kinnock

                     Stephen Kinnock

Stephen Kinnock (Aberavon MP):

“Electoral reform is often branded as an issue for political anoraks, but nothing could be further from the truth. In fact it is one of the defining bread-and-butter issues of our time, because it is about the way in which power and resources are distributed across our country.

“We know that general elections are won or lost in the swing seats of Middle England and Middle Wales. This concentration of influence leads inevitably to the skewing of policy and investment towards certain geographical areas and communities.

“First Past the Post is inimical to the one nation politics that we so desperately need to build. It militates against the re-balancing of our economy, sucks resources, investment and policy priorities away from constituencies that are in greatest need of support, and deepens divisions between our already fractured communities.

“Let's stop seeing electoral reform as an end in itself, and let's instead start seeing it as the cornerstone for building a better, fairer and more balanced Britain.”

                            Clive Lewis

                            Clive Lewis

Clive Lewis (Norwich South MP):

“A shift to a proportional voting system is now an urgent imperative. PR will actually give the people power to speak, it will give us proper democracy.”

                      Alan Whitehead

                      Alan Whitehead

Alan Whitehead (Southampton Test MP):

“Electoral reform has always been about ensuring fair representation for votes cast, but now it assumes a new dimension with the volatility in voting we are now experiencing, where temporary minorities can be swept away on an unfair system, exaggerating and extending short term voting trends. First Past the Post surely cannot now be the basis for building and maintaining proper long term political choice.”

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Legacy of late Labour Electoral Reformers

Legacy of late Labour Electoral Reformers

                    Mo Mowlam

                    Mo Mowlam

Mo Mowlam: “This is an opportunity for all of us to discuss how politics can connect more closely to the decisions which affect their lives. Politics should not be about scoring points. It should be about getting things done, making politicians listen and making votes count.”

                                  Robin Cook

                                  Robin Cook

Robin Cook: It’s very important that we are clear that we are not interested in electoral reform for functional reasons because we see it as a means to an end. The electoral system to the House of Commons is a crucial part of our democracy. And for Labour democracy cannot be just viewed as a means, it is also a value, a value which expresses how fair, how open and how equal we are in our society. At the moment we have a democracy that fails to match that value and that’s why it’s a matter of principle that we must insist on it being changed.